seeing

Darsha

Acharya Mahapragya, India

(Submitted by The Art of Living Team)

Indian philosophy, or ‘darsha’, is based on perception, or seeing. In fact, 'darsha’ means seeing or perceiving. Its meaning has changed now. The philosophy being taught in colleges and universities today is based on inference and reasoning, but in ancient times it stood for direct apprehension. Not inference, not abstract reasoning, not causation, not universality or pervasiveness, but sheer apprehension. Today, we have lost the power to see and we fail to distinguish between thinking and perceiving.

Lint

Connie Spittler, USA

(Submitted by the author)

Years ago, I met a man who noticed lint. After Reinhold Marxhausen watched his wife clean the clothes dryer screen, he began to collect this peculiar stuff, not seeing throwaway material, but texture, color and invention. A Professor of Art at Concordia College in Nebraska, he layered the multi-colored fibers under glass, forming abstractions that echoed landscape. I bought one, as a reminder to look more closely at my immediate world.

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Light is God

Harvey Lloyd, USA

(Submitted by the author)

Our eyes do not see, any more than our computer thinks. Our eyes are marvelous tools for recording and transmitting photons of light to our brains in the form of electrical signals. Beginning at the retina, a series of computer-like programs analyze, censor, delete and send certain amounts of information to various parts of the brain. This is not widely understood. Most of us were raised and taught that we ‘see’ with our eyes.

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